Saturday, December 6, 2008

[MLE] 2009 Education for All Global Monitoring Report Available


Dear MLE friends,
The medium of instruction had statistically significant effects: if at least half of schools offer the opportunity to learn in a home language, attendance rises by approximately 10% (Smits et al., 2008).”  And some more interesting statements below.
Regards,
Karsten

Karsten van Riezen
Education Consultant, SIL Int.
SIL, South Asia Group.

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From: Katherine Buehler
Sent: 01 December 2008 16:20
To: katherine_buehler@sil.org
Subject: [] 2009 Education for All Global Monitoring Report Available

The 2009 Education for All Global Monitoring Report was officially launched on 25 November 2008 at the International Conference on Education. The Report's theme is Overcoming Equality: Why Governance Matters.
Dave Pearson noted an interesting quote on page 78: Language-based disparities. There are large differences in school attendance and completion among linguistic groups. Analysis of household data for 22 countries and over 160 linguistic groups has attempted to identify the weight of different factors behind disparities. It is estimated that socio-economic factors such as household wealth and location account for less than half of observed differences in education outcomes among linguistic groups. So what factors account for the balance of the disparities? The medium of instruction had statistically significant effects: if at least half of schools offer the opportunity to learn in a home language, attendance rises by approximately 10% (Smits et al., 2008). Children living in rural areas were found to be at a particular disadvantage if they did not have access to school instruction in their mother tongue. These results add further weight to the growing body of evidence on the benefits of using the mother tongue in schools, at least in the early years.
The PDF report (almost 10 mb) is available here.
Katherine

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