Showing posts with label language. Show all posts
Showing posts with label language. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 3, 2020

School Teacher Translates Textbooks

Ranjitsinh Disale (Photo used with permission from the Varkey Foundation)

Congratulations to Ranjitsinh Disale on being nominated for a prestigious prize for innovations in girls' education. Good to read that "Disale not only translated the class textbooks into his pupils’ mother tongue, but also embedded them with unique QR codes to give students access to audio poems, video lectures, stories and assignments."

Saturday, August 8, 2020

The Role of Language in the New National Education Policy


Photo by Jaikishan Patel from Unsplash


Last week the Indian government cleared a new National Education Policy (NEP). An NEP sets the framework for education for approximately the next 10 years. It is therefore worth looking at it from a language perspective. The policy gives a push for multilingualism and at first glance it seems that the pedagogical principle of children being taught in their mother tongue is kept up. However a closer look reveals that it is more complex than that.

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Book: Language in Education for Migrants and Refugees

The full book is available on the UNESCO website

The issues related to migrants and refugees are more acute than ever. The free e-book Approaches to Language in Education for Migrants and Refugees in the Asia-Pacific Region looks into the issue of language in education for these people on the move. The book is published by UNESCO Bangkok and Kathleen Heugh was the first author, but many others also contributed to this 40 page book.

Monday, June 1, 2020

118 Books in 95 languages - COVID-19


Good to note that more easy-to-read small books on COVID-19 are becoming available in local languages. I noticed one in Gadaba language, spoken in Orissa/India, with local photos and with input from a doctor living in the area. Other available materials were translated via Bloom from international booklets. Good!

Still we have a long way to go to get the information out!


Regards,
Karsten


Friday, October 4, 2019

[MLE] Conference on MLE, Mobility and Inclusion

Dr Michel Kenmogne gives a welcome speech at the reception on the first day of the conference.

Last week I attended  the “Inclusion, Mobility and Multilingual Education Conference” in Bangkok. This time the MLE conference was done together with the British Council’s recurring conference on Language and Education which resulted in a larger and richer conference with about 450 participants from a broad range of disciplines participating. The topic of “inclusion and mobility” provided a good opportunity to link MLE to the increasing number of issues around migration and identity. At least 30 participants were from India, several of who gave a presentation. For now, we will give a few impressions with links to abstracts. At a later stage, the full presentations will become available.

Thursday, August 29, 2019

[MLE] UNICEF report on Early Literacy and Multilingual Education in South Asia

Final Report “Early Literacy and Multilingual Education in South Asia” 

A few months ago UNICEF published the final report on their research on Early Literacy and Multilingual Education in South Asia. The study is based on literature review on early literacy and multilingual education, surveys of students’ literacy achievements in primary grades, analysis of sociolinguistic situations, and policy and programme documents. That 100 page report is worth noting!

Friday, June 28, 2019

[MLE] Draft National Education Policy

Reading is hard work, particularly in a language you hardly know! (Photo Credit: Business Standard)
This month there were plenty of articles in the newspaper talking about language and education because of the publication of the Draft National Education Policy (NEP) which stated: “Three-language formula will need to be implemented in its spirit throughout the country, promoting multilingual communicative abilities for a multilingual country.” Of course, there was the controversy around the promotion of Hindi, but there were also plenty of references to the value of multilingual education.

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

[MLE] Resources from Indian Soil - Book and Video




Prof Ajit Mohanty recently published a book on multilingual realities and Dr Dhir Jingran was interviewed for a video on multilingual teaching. Both worth taking note of.

Thursday, January 10, 2019

[MLE] 6th Multilingual Education Conference - Bangkok September 2019

MLE5 Partners Copyright © 2018 SIL International
Every two years the International MLE conference in Bangkok is a highlight for MLE practitioners and scholars. This year the 6th Multilingual Education Conference will be combined with the 13th Language and Development Conference (LDC) and address the important issues of language, human mobility, multilingual education and development. Proposals for individual presentations and panels must be received by 28 February 2019. Below are some of the details.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

[MLE] MultiLila Research Project

Illustration: University of Cambridge


The project, “Multilingualism and Multiliteracy: Raising learning outcomes in challenging contexts in primary schools across India”, is investigating under which circumstances a high quality multilingual education can be delivered in India where many children currently fail to achieve basic literacy and numeracy levels.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

[MLE] SALZBURG STATEMENT

Salzburg Statement for a Multilingual World
Photo by Peter Hershey on Unsplash


While attending an International Mother Language Day function in Bangkok last month I heard about the Salzburg Statement and decided to learn more about it. The statement is basically a call on educators, businesses and governments to promote language diversity as a global norm.

Monday, March 20, 2017

[MLE] Mother Language day - Updates and Resources

International Mother Language Day 2017 (Image source- en.unesco.org)

In the week of the International Mother Language Day there are usually extra postings related to language and education. Particularly because this year the theme is: “Towards Sustainable Futures through Multilingual Education”. It is also a good excuse to list a few (new) resources.

The postings in the India Express and India Today are quite general in nature with some quotations from Unesco and background on the history of the day. WebIndia reports that activist used the day to demand linguistic parity for the regional languages. Chanpreet Kaur published an interview with Dr Mukti Sanyal on How the focus on English could be seriously damaging India's future with an interesting link to self-esteem: “We are losing our mother languages. And with it, we are losing self esteem, different ways of seeing the world, and encouraging the mugging up of the concepts”. Scroll.in used the opportunity to dig into history: Which 'mother language' did India's lawmakers want after Independence? A nice news item is that the goverment of Bengal gave Kurukh language an official status and a promise that Rajbangshi/Kamtapuri will also be given that status.

Saturday, October 29, 2016

[MLE] Book release: English and multilingual education

New book on multilingual education in India with a special focus on teaching English.

 

Dr Mahendra Mishra is a well known figure in the area of multilingual education in India. He  was State Coordinator for Multilingual Education (1996-2010) in Odisha and spearheaded the mother tongue-based multilingual education in the primary schools in ten tribal languages there. So, when he (co-)writes a book, we better take notice!


MLE proponents usually have a love-hate relationship with English as the English is often suppressing the building of a good foundation in the mother tongue. It is therefore quite courageous to write a book on "Multilingual Education in India: The Case for English". The description makes you want to read more: 
"Some perceive English language education as a hindrance to the growth of lndian languages and allege that it causes a social divide. The arguments of this book convincingly correct this uninformed notion and prove that English has been a tool of empowerment and a driver of social and economic mobility. The contributors demonstrate that local languages and cultures can be revived by integrating them into English language education."


Tuesday, October 18, 2016

[MLE] Conference on Language and Education starting tomorrow

5th International Conference on Language and Education will start tomorrow

 


The 5th International Conference on Language and Education will  take stock of recent developments in MLE policies and practices in the Asia-Pacific region, with a special focus on multilingual education in early childhood and primary education.There will be several presentations relevant to India.
 
The conference will start tomorrow with opening speeches from UNESCO and the Thai government. The Keynote address will be on "Supporting MTB­MLE to achieve sustainable development for all: what have we learned about successful programs?" by Dr Susan Malone (SIL International). Some of the India related presentations are:

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Language and the Sustainable Development Goals - UN Symposium

British Council Panel

Symposium: Language and language differences tend to get taken for granted by planners


The Study Group on Language and the United Nations, an independent group of scholars and practitioners on matters related to language, convened a symposium on Language and the Sustainable Development Goals in New York, on 21 and 22 April 2016.  Its goal was to examine the importance of issues of language in the formulation, implementation, and successful completion of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 


Thursday, February 4, 2016

[MLE] 5th International Conference on Language and Education - Bangkok Oct 16

5th International Conference on Language and Education

 

The International Conferences on Language and Education, which have been organized by a large group of agencies in Asia, have over the years impacted many projects in India. The 5th one will be held this year, again in Bangkok. The following announcement has been copied from the UNESCO MLE Newsletter
 

Asia Pacific Multilingual Education Working Group (MLE WG) will be organizing its 5th International Conference on Language and Education on 19-21 October 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand.

The 5th International Conference on Language and Education will take stock of recent developments in MLE policies and practices in the Asia-Pacific region, with a special focus on multilingual education in early childhood and primary education.
      
It will likewise look at innovative pedagogies in the training of MLE teachers. Finally, it will examine challenges and lesson learned from the EFA experience and give opportunities for forward-looking discussions on both the role of language in achieving the new SDGs and preserving a harmonious relationship between the global and local contexts.

The conference features four thematic tracks.
  • Track 1: Towards Sound Policies on Multilingual Education: Language and Language-in-Education Policy and Planning in Asia and the Pacific.
  • Track 2: MLE Teachers and Teacher Training for MLE
  • Track 3: MLE Practice/Praxis in Early Childhood and Primary Education
  • Track 4: Language and Cross-Cutting Issues of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)

The Call for Papers is now open and the deadline for submission is 30 March 2016.
Usually there is quite a few delegates from India. Hopefully that will work out this year also!
Regards,
Karsten


http://www.mle-india.net/

Copyright © 2016 Karsten van Riezen, All rights reserved.
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Friday, July 24, 2015

[MLE] Local languages taught in Uttarakhand

Kumauni & Gharwali taught at schools in Uttarakhand

Photo: http://www.shaktihimalaya.com/
 

The government of Uttarakhand has decided to have the two major vernacular languages of the state, Kumauni and Gharwali, taught at all the primary schools.


The article "Grads in Kumaoni, Garhwali may be taken as primary, junior school teachers"  in the Times of India presents it an an employment opportunity, but it seems much more than that.  The article quotes Prof Dr.. S.S. Bisht saying: ""This is very good news for us, as teaching the languages to students from class I will help revive not only the dialects but also their associated cultures," Interestingly now the state is struggling to find enough qualified teachers to implement this: "It will be difficult to meet such a high demand in so short time. However, from this academic year, we have introduced options to study the language as an elective or as a single-subject course to increase the number of students,"

For me personally this is fun news as we lived in the Kumaun for many years and Dr Bisht was our neighbor. Congratulations, Dr Bisht for your hard work!

Saturday, May 16, 2015

[MLE] British Council: Language and Development Conference


Conference on Multilingualism and Development

 

As part of the series of conferences on Language and Development the Britisch Council is this year organising a conference in Delhi on Multilingualism and Development

 
The Website of the Britisch Council states: "The Language and Development series is a conference held every two years that explores the role of language in development. It addresses the issues of world, national, second and minority languages and the role they play in economic, social and cultural development; language policy, conflict transformation, language rights and identity; communication, education and development and language pedagogy.

The Subthemes listed for this particular conference are:
  • Multilingualism and the metropolis
  • Language, technology and multi-literacies
  • Multilingualism, marginalisation and empowerment
Several of the topics listed under each subtheme are related to education.

This 11th International Language and Development Conference is  scheduled to be held in New Delhi, as a three day event for 250 participants from 18 - 20 November 2015.

Saturday, November 29, 2014

[MLE] MLE related books and papers

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An emerging research partnership for multilingual education
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Multilingual Education Related Resources

 

Dear Multilingual Education Friends,

Sometimes we come across beautiful resources awhile after they were published.  Here are a few:

  • Common tongue: The impact of language on educational outcomes, a paper by Tarun Jain (2011) in which he explores the issue of language in relation to economic performance. He studies the impact that the reorganisation of Indian states has made on economic status on  the district level in relation to the language spoken. He concludes: “After reorganization, historically minority language districts experience greater growth in educational achievement compared to previously majority language districts, indicating that reassignment could reverse the impact of history.”
  • Children’s Literature in Multilingual Classrooms: From multiliteracy to multimodality, a book by Jim Cummings (foreword), Christine Hélot, Raymonde Sneddon and Nicola Day. Even though it is not about India, it seems relevant, as the description states: “It looks specifically at how translation can support learning, at how dual language books enhance learning in both languages, and at making and reading books from a variety of cultural backgrounds and in a variety of languages.  It provides much evidence for improved learning outcomes as well as children's social and personal development.”
  • Assessing early grade reading: The value and limits of ‘words per minute’,  a paper written by Barbara Graham and Agatha van Ginkel. This research paper is interesting for those of us involved in grading and research as in the study also two minority language speaking groups were included. The conclusion is that “WPM is not a reliable comparative measure of reading development since linguistic and orthographic features can differ considerably and are likely to influence the reading acquisition process.”
As so many of us know Dhir Jhingran, let me also mention here about his recent article entitled: Writing on board: Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan must be phased out.
Enough to read for today!

Karsten
http://www.mle-india.net/
Book: Multilingual Classrooms
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Saturday, March 1, 2014

[MLE] New book - Orthographies

Dear Multilingual education friends,

Some of the tribal groups in need for education in their mother tongue do not yet have a proper orthography. A new books has come out that topic:

 
Developing Orthographies for Unwritten Languages
Linguistics and Orthography
 ·         Michael Cahill & Keren Rice (Editors). 2014. Developing Orthographies for Unwritten Languages. SIL International. 276 pgs
·         

It is available in India via flipkart and Amazon . The table of content is given below.