Monday, January 16, 2012

[MLE] People’s Linguistic Survey of India Conference

Dear multilingual education friends,

Earlier this months the People's Linguistic Survey of India  (PLSI) conference took place. 900 delegates from all over the world gathered in Baroda to celebrate the progress on survey.

A quote from the Lit-Ityadi report
Anyone familiar with George Grierson's historic work, the Linguistic Survey of India, compiled nearly 100 years ago, will immediately note the similarities. What is different however, about the PLSI, is the notion of networking, now made by possible by modern methods of communication, that enables adivasi people from Orissa to dance shoulder to shoulder with Bhili tribesmen from Gujarat. This sense of solidarity was felt, not only between the Indian delegates, but also internationally as we heard from indigenous people from Papua New Guinea and various parts of Africa.
A quote from the Times of India report
This is a survey of languages by persons belonging to the language community. We have used a 'minimum format' for the non-scheduled languages. It includes features like name, location and local history of the languages; some samples of songs and stories, kinship terms and nominal grammar. For the scheduled languages the entries are very elaborate - almost a book length for every language. The 12 volumes that are ready run into about 6,000 pages. The completed work in 42 volumes will have about 20,000 printed pages. The work is done with the help of a large team of nearly 1,800 persons and a large multi-disciplinary National Editorial Collective of scholars.
The Daily News Analyses report gave their article a positive heading: "Tribal Languages are not dying":
If you thought that the number of people speaking the languages used by tribes, nomads and de-notified tribes of India was falling with every generation, then you are in for a surprise. A survey of People's Linguistic Survey of India (PLSI) conducted by tribal activist and linguist, Dr Ganesh Devy, reveals that the number of languages considered weak had fallen. This indicates that the so-called 'weak languages' had actually a large number of speakers.

Saturday, January 7, 2012

[MLE] Book from Prime Minister of Singapore on bilingualism

Dear MLE friends,

It is not often that top politicians write elaborately about issues related to multilingualism. Lee Kuan Yew the former prime minister of Singapore published recently "My lifelong challenge: Singapore's bilingual journey". He has been strong advocate of maintaining Chinese and other mother tongues within the schools in Singapore while still making English the mainstream language.


Some quotes from a Asia One newspaper review:
My Lifelong Challenge is the story of Mr Lee Kuan Yew's 50-year struggle to transform Singapore from a polyglot former British colony into a united nation where everyone, while knowing English, knows at least one other language, his own mother tongue. The founding prime minister of Singapore tells why he did away with vernacular schools in spite of violent political resistance, why he closed Nanyang University, why he later started Special Assistance Plan schools, and why he continues to urge all ethnic Chinese Singaporeans today to learn the Chinese language.
Mr Patrick Daniel, Editor-in-Chief of Singapore Press Holdings' English and Malay Newspapers Division, said: "This book recounts an important facet of Singapore's history. It contains insights, borne of experience, about the challenge of ensuring that each community preserves its own language and culture in a multiracial nation, while adopting English as the working language. It comes at an opportune moment too, as the world sees its centre of gravity shifting from West to East. I am glad that The Straits Times has had a part in bringing out this book."

In Singapore, former senior minister of state for community development Ch'ng Jit Koon said: "To this day, some people do not approve of the bilingual policy as a foundation stone of the nation. This book describes fully, accurately and clearly the background to these policies, helping us to understand why he did what he did. Whether the bilingual policy is right or wrong, history will be the judge. But if he had not done what he did, our country would not be what it is today."

[MLE] The blog is celebrating its first birthday!


Dear multilingual education friends,
The MLE India webblog is celebrating its first birthday! A good excuse for giving it a easier URL www.mle-india.net and a facelift: have look at the new lay-out.
The site is more than just a list of the postings on the MLE mailing list. It also has the following pages:

      • MLE Related Projects: An overview of multilingual education related projects in India

      • MLE Related Books : An overview of written resources related to multilingual education with relevance to India

      • MLE Related Policies: Relevant sections from the Indian constitution, the National Curriculum Framework and the Right to Education Act.

      • MLE related Courses & Events : Courses and workshops offered in this region on multilingual education