Tuesday, March 1, 2011

[MLE] Moving from "Why" to "How"; CfBT/SC report

Dear MLE friends,
This week a lot of news items were found on the internet related to multilingualism and MLE because of the celebrations on the Mother Language Day. The release of a new report from SC is one that caught my eye because it also has references to India: Reflecting language diversity in children’s schooling: moving from ‘Why multilingual education’ to ‘How?’ by Helen Pinnock . Here is the news release from the CfBT website:
Today, 21 February, CfBT releases new research to coincide with International Mother Tongue Language Day. The research, undertaken with Save the Children, examines how multilingual education in Africa, Asia and Latin America can be made possible.  The research focuses on two well-developed multi-lingual education projects run by Save the Children with local partners in Vietnam and Bangladesh as well as material from government-led projects in Andhra Pradesh and Orissa in India.
The report itself can be downloaded from: http://www.cfbt.com/evidenceforeducation/pdf/Research%20Report%20FINAL.pdf. It contains a 2 page case study on the SSA Andhra Pradesh MLE programme.
The full news release is copied below.
Karsten
Karsten van Riezen
Education Consultant, SIL Int.
SIL, South Asia Group

http://mle-india.blogspot.com/
LinkedIn Profile
Recommended: http://www.nmrc-jnu.org/

Disclaimer: This mailing list is an informal way to share MLE related information. The sender neither claims credit or responsibility for the reports and events shared through this mailing list. Subscribing or unsubscribe by writing "[MLE] Subscribe" or "[MLE] Unsubscribe" in the subject-line and send a message to: karsten_van_riezen@sil.org. Any contributions or suggestions are welcome.
_____________________________ CfBT news release ________________________________________
Date: 21 February 2011
MOVING FROM WHY MULTI-LINGUAL EDUCATION TO HOW?
Today, 21 February, CfBT releases new research to coincide with International Mother Tongue Language Day. The research, undertaken with Save the Children, examines how multilingual education in Africa, Asia and Latin America can be made possible.  The research focuses on two well-developed multi-lingual education projects run by Save the Children with local partners in Vietnam and Bangladesh as well as material from government-led projects in Andhra Pradesh and Orissa in India.
Key findings included a recurring theme of fear shared by government, school leaders and parents that by reducing second language use in schools young people would become less skilled in languages that may have special status nationally or internationally.
The research demonstrates it is essential for key stakeholders to recognise that strong demands for national or international languages, such as English, will only be met through carefully introducing second languages to children as part of learning activities across all the thematic areas of the curriculum.
In many areas of our work abroad CfBT’s aim is to balance strong skills in English across the curriculum with a respect for communities’ rights to maintain and develop their own cultural identities and languages.’
‘There are many ways forward to multi-lingual education. Brunei has a ‘home-grown’ solution to a very complex educational dilemma,’ says Dr Greg Keaney, CfBT Education Director, Brunei. ‘The ‘mother tongue’ situation in Brunei is complex with a range of indigenous languages as well as various Chinese dialects and regional varieties of Malay. Within this context CfBT teachers are engaged to teach English to pupils aged four and upwards. Bruneian students then go through both Primary and Secondary school with English as the main instructional language for ‘core’ subjects and with Malay used for a variety of other subjects linked to religion, culture and, of course, Malay language and literature.’
Today’s research paper offers advice on how to have the best chance of putting the right changes in place to help children learn in a way they understand. Recommendations are offered as to how to progressively shift school systems towards delivering effective learning across the curriculum and good language skills in key local, national and international languages.
The full research report, Reflecting language diversity in children’s schooling: moving from ‘Why multilingual education’ to ‘How?’ Report of an action learning initiative, is available from www.cfbt.com
-ends-
Notes to editors
CfBT Education Trust is a leading education consultancy and service organisation. Our object is to provide education for public benefit both in the UK and internationally. Established 40 years ago CfBT Education Trust now has an annual turnover exceeding £100 million and employs more than 2,650 staff worldwide who support educational reform, teach, advise, research and train. As a not-for-profit organisation we commit around £1million of our surpluses every year for practice-based educational research.
Visit www.cfbt.com for more information.
For more information contact:
Sandra Ingham
External Communication Manager, CfBT Education Trust
60 Queens Road
Reading, RG1 4BS
0118 902 1841 / singham@cfbt.com / www.cfbt.com
You can read the full new release at: http://www.cfbt.com/newsandevents/latestnews/multilingualeducation.aspx
--
Education Consultant; SIL Intl, Mobile: 09868891282

No comments:

Post a Comment